Mixing Methamphetamine with Energy Drinks

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For the college student who is dealing with many new responsibilities along with lack of sleep or energy, stimulants may be commonly used and accessed as a means of increasing energy levels.  Some of the most frequently used stimulants among college students include caffeine, energy drinks, and sometimes the use of drugs, both prescription and illicit forms.

The Fad of Energy Drinks

Men Using Energy Drinks To Help Them Lift More Weights - Addiction HopeEnergy drinks are frequently consumed among college students for various reasons, including for the purpose of boosting energy, attempting to enhance performance while competing in sports activities, or for the purpose of mixing with other alcoholic beverages or drugs.

Energy drinks can be easily purchased at grocery or convenience stores and often contains a variety of ingredients, including caffeine, sugar, and other stimulant ingredients, such as guarana, taurine, and ginsing.   Statistical surveys have found that approximately 34 percent of 18-24 year olds regularly consume energy drinks, which are the common ages of college students [1].

Energy drinks alone can be dangerous in multiple ways, including cardiovascular complications, energy crashes, sleep and appetite disturbances, dehydration, and more.  When mixed with other substances, such as alcohol or drugs like methamphetamine, the dangerous effects of both the energy drinks and substance can be intensified.

Methamphetamine Acts As A Stimulant

Female Hand Retrieving Methamphetamine From Her Pocket - Addiction HopeMethamphetamine, in particular, is a substance that acts as a stimulant.  Combining a stimulant with an energy drink that is already dense with other ingredients that are functioning as stimulants can effectually drive the body into overload, risking many serious physical consequences.

Combining substances, such as methamphetamine, with energy drinks may seem harmless, especially if your peers are all doing the same thing.  Do not fall into the trap of believing that these behaviors are okay.

If you are found yourself engaging in risky behaviors when it comes to drugs, alcohol and even energy drinks, please find someone you trust that you can talk with.  Your life is worth more than a temporary high or energy boost, and there are other healthier, natural ways to pick up your energy levels without risking your life or health.

Community Discussion – Share your thoughts here!

Mixing drugs or alcohol with energy drinks is something that is commonly observed among many social groups.  What suggestions might you have for an individual who routinely facing pressure to engage in these dangerous behaviors?  What resources might be available for students on campus who do this repetitively?


Headshot Of Crystal Karges - Addiction HopeAbout the Author:

Crystal is a Masters-level Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) with a specialty focus in eating disorders, maternal/child health and wellness, and intuitive eating. Combining clinical experience with a love of social media and writing, Crystal serves as the Director of Content and Social Media for Eating Disorder Hope/Addiction Hope, where her passion to help others find recovery and healing is integrated into each part of her work.

As a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor, Crystal has dedicated her career to helping others establish a healthy relationship with food and body through her work with EDH/AH and nutrition private practice.


References:

[1]: American College of Medical Toxicology, “Energy Drinks”, http://www.acmt.net/Energy_Drinks_.html


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of addictions. These are not necessarily the views of Addiction Hope, but an effort to offer discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Addiction Hope understand that addictions result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an addiction, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Last Updated & Reviewed By: Jacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC on October 18, 2016
Published on AddictionHope.com