Depression & Sex Addiction: How Can God Help Me?

Woman who is struggling with Depression

“The terrible, tragic fallacy of the last hundred years has been to think that all man’s troubles are due to his environment, and that to change the man you have nothing to do but change his environment. That is a tragic fallacy. It overlooks the fact that it was in Paradise that man fell.” [1] – Dr. Martyn Lloyd Jones. Studies in the Sermon on the Mount

Understanding Depression

One way to see depression is to see it as the nasty despair of the soul that one should avoid at all cost, and as someone who has struggled with the real trouble that depression causes, I can understand why one might choose to see it that way.

However, it seems to me that a better way to understand depression is to see it more like a sign. You know those warning signs when you’re driving that tell you “SLOW DOWN, DANGER AHEAD” or the signs that say, “BE CAREFUL, ABRUPT BUMP AHEAD.”

Yes, you could curse the signs, step on the gas, and hope for the best, but if you’re wise, you’ll slow down. You will take in more information, and let the signs inform you about the space in which you find yourself.

Depression and Sex Addiction are companions. Until you see the connection, you won’t be able to read the signs of your depression. You can’t get in front of it, or course correct it at its source (your addiction).

Think about it…Sex addiction is innately selfish at its core. Whether it’s pornography, sexual abuse of another, or casual sexual encounters, the core issues are the same; selfishness, a false sense of intimacy, false view of self, and ultimately self-loathing, and an existential angst of hopelessness.

Don’t blame depression as an unavoidable reality, or as something that just sort of happened to you. A wise person will see depression as a natural outcome of making sinful, selfish, and self-destructive sexual choices.

Suddenly, what used to be a curse (depression) quickly becomes a gift for the introspective, wise person who is listening closely to the delicate nature of his or her own health.

Martyn Lloyd Jones, a clinical doctor, turned preacher, realized that so much of what his patients needed in his medical profession is something that he could only give them through the word of God and prayer.

Man struggling with addictionLloyd Jones realized that every addiction, every depression, and every sadness was a result of the tragic fall from grace as realized in Genesis 3. What he found 50 years ago is as insightful for us today. That is this; depression testifies to our own conscience and that we truly were not made for this world or the pleasures it offers.

We were made for something far greater, and the path ahead to happiness isn’t by quenching our depression or sadness. It’s by letting it inform us that this isn’t the real world.

Don’t settle for the imitation of sexual addiction, seek the substance that comes from knowing Jesus.


Pastor Ryan Moffet family photoAbout the Author:

Ryan Moffat is the teaching pastor at Vast Church in Sisters, OR and is currently working on his Masters in Theology at Western Seminary in Portland, OR

Ryan received his BS in Bible and Theology and a minor in counseling from Multnomah University. He has pastored students, families and is passionate about Christ-centered recovery and healing. He’s been married to his beautiful wife Michelle for 13 years and they enjoy raising four crazy, unique and special kids together.


References:

[1]: https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/7810781.D_Martyn_Lloyd_Jones


The opinions and views of our guest contributors are shared to provide a broad perspective of addictions. These are not necessarily the views of Addiction Hope, but an effort to offer discussion of various issues by different concerned individuals.

We at Addiction Hope understand that addictions result from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. If you or a loved one are suffering from an addiction, please know that there is hope for you, and seek immediate professional help.

Published on August 25, 2017
Reviewed By: Jacquelyn Ekern, MS, LPC on August 25, 2017.
Published on AddictionHope.com